What makes publishing difficult?

 

So you have written a book, maybe a novel. How do you start publishing it so readers will be able to find it? And why is it so hard and complicated? Because there is no perfect way in which to hack or game the publishing industry.

 

Gaming the Publishing Industry

 

I was at a writing conference last week and noticed that several times I passed groups of writers who were trying to figure out how to “Game the System.”

In case you didn’t know it, every distribution industry tries to set up roadblocks for creators so that they can’t bypass the system. For example, if you were to make a movie and try to go out and distribute it to movie theaters yourself, you’d find that the theaters have contracts with the major distributors that require them to not show your movie. The distributors want to make sure that the huge movies that they’ve invested in advertising are available at all of the usual outlets.

 

In publishing, we have two different distribution systems.

 

The traditional publishing industry has its editors, and they have contracts with the bookstores and with the book distribution companies that are designed to keep you from selling your books at bookstores—and these contracts are very effective. If you’ve ever tried to start your own publishing company, you’ll see what I mean. Not only will distributors refuse to distribute your books, but I once struggled for days to get some television and radio companies to advertise a book—but they refused to work with anyone who wasn’t already a major publisher.

 

In traditional publishing, the publisher typically creates a “list” of books that they want to promote.

 

The #1 book on the list gets most of the advertising dollars. This might include things like in-store displays, money for cooperative advertising so that the bookstores will place the book on certain shelves with the covers facing out, promotion on radio or television or in magazines or newspapers, and of course money to send the author out on a book tour.

 

If you’re not #1 on your publisher’s list, you might not get any of these things.

 

Instead, your book is simply put out there and left to sink or swim on its own merits. Your editor might not even send it out for reviews from critics. And the publisher will actively stop you from doing too much. For example, let’s say that you don’t like the cover that your publisher gives you—either the picture or the typeface. What can you do? You can complain, and you might get some upgrades, but it is the job of the artistic director to make sure that the #1 book of the season gets the best cover and that each month when new books are shipped out, the monthly books look good, but not as good as the anticipated season hit. The reason for this is that the publisher doesn’t want to confuse the buyers.

 

They don’t want a mediocre book to have a great cover.

 

So as an author, you may find yourself trying to figure out how to “game the system”. This could include figuring out how to promote the book that your publisher won’t. In doing that, you might begin by advertising on social media. You can send books out to book bloggers, set up your own book signings, create a “book bomb” in order to generate some excitement for your release, and so on. All of that is fine, so long as you remember that the best advertisement for a book is to write another book.

 

Your current and future fans are always eager to see what you have next in the pipeline.

 

Indie publishers are often even more eager to game the system. In recent years, Amazon has been working to create a “system” that will reward good books with good reviews and promotion. Indie authors however, always seem to be bent on destroying that system. I’ve seen them buy favorable reviews (spending as much as $10,000 on a package), creating sock-puppets so that they can go online and create their own favorable reviews. They even use them to deride their competition, and of course trade positive reviews with other authors. As a result of such activities—all of which are immoral and some of them even illegal, Amazon has purchased review sites and now blocks reviews that they believe are fake.

In fact, I’ve known several authors who find that if their book does too well, defies expectations that Amazon has set, then their books are simply delisted—taken off of the bestseller lists, and even taken off of Amazon’s sales site.

 

To be frank, we need our distributors to create a fair and honest system that rewards great work.

 

How should we as authors handle this problem? I think that we need to promote ourselves in every way that we can, so long as it is honorable and honest. At the same time, put your emphasis where it belongs: On writing powerful works. If you do that, success will come eventually!

***

Help us Out!

Thank you for supporting David Farland's writing tips. Please help us out by sharing this writing tip with others this week.

Down about conventions being canceled? Apex-Writers has got you covered!
We always have a stellar lineup of guests and fantastic content for you! Twice a week we set up calls with different authors, publishers, agents, marketing specialist, actors, movie producers, and more. During this time members have the opportunity listen to the instruction/advice of the guest. As well as the opportunity to submit questions and have them answered.  Visit Apex-Writers.com to sign up now so you don't miss anything!

Throw in thousands of dollars in writing classes, along with access to writing groups after the various workshops, and you’ll get an idea of what we’re about. And right now the price is only $299 a year, or less than $30 per month. Go to Apex-Writers.com to learn more and find out how to join.

______

ATTENTION !

Need a writing mentor and guide? David Farland is the best-selling author of over 50 books and anthologies. Nearly 100 of Dave's past students have gone on to become bestsellers, including eight who have hit #1 on the New York Times Bestseller list. He has contributed to the careers of: Brandon Sanderson (Wheel of Time), Stephenie Meyer (Twilight), James Dashner (Maze Runner) and many more. The list is growing and you can be next!

The Super Writers Bundle will get you access to all of David's online courses, workshops, seminars and his top 4 bestselling writing books. These normally cost more than $2,280. But with this bundle, you can get them all for only $199! Visit MyStoryDoctor.com! 

______