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How to Reach Your Writing Zone, Part 2

Getting into the zone often requires you to make repeated attempts to focus deeper and deeper upon your work. Indeed, now that I think about it, I can recall a couple of occasions when I found myself carried away in my work at a time when I already felt physically and emotionally exhausted.

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Trusting Your Process

As you do this you’ll find yourself thrust into an imaginary world where your character must react to stimuli and try to overcome obstacles. It only takes about 25 minutes of doing this for you to reach that Beta-state of consciousness.

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How to be an Imaginative Writer

Creating that world is a simple trick.  We “create” the world by reporting on it, repeatedly using images, sights, sounds, smells, and tastes that excite the mind and make it feel real.  Very often, to create that world requires us to repeat information in different ways.  For example, if I want to create “rain” in my story, I must have my reader see it coming in the distance, smell the taste of moisture in the air, feel the wet drops as they begin to plop down, and so on.  

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Creating Rooting Interest Early

We develop strong rooting interest and care more about characters who care deeply about something, who are committed to something.  Perhaps they care about their families, or have a powerful love for their country.  Maybe your character loves his horse, or is uncommonly honest or honorable.

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Greenlight Your Story’s Concept

In short, a story isn’t just one idea, it’s a conglomeration—basic concepts about characters, how and why they act, and how others react to them.  If you analyze even a short story, one that is only ten pages long, you’ll find that the author makes dozens, maybe even hundreds of choices regarding milieu, character, conflict, theme, and treatment.

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Rules for Your Writing Group

In our Apex writing group, Apex is an umbrella organization that provides services for a large number of writers, but we also encourage writers to do things in smaller groups. For example, some writers are having great success by meeting together for daily writing sprints, or weekly brainstorming sessions or critique groups.  Remember, a writing group is a living, growing thing. It may change over time, and your rules need to evolve with it.

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Deciding What to Write

Before you start writing a novel, screenplay, or any tale at all, you should look at two things:  Do you like the basic concept? Will the story sell? In short, before you write anything, you need to take an adequate survey of the field.  

Read More »

Deciding What to Write

Before you start writing a novel, screenplay, or any tale at all, you should decide a number of things:    1) Do you like the

Read More »

Writing Media Tie-ins

One perennial need is for novelists to write film or gaming tie-ins. If you are a successful writer, the chances are excellent that all kinds

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A Kick in the Pants: Attributions in Dialog

There are a lot of ways to weave your attribution into your dialog. For example, bestseller John Green will often have well-known characters talk without description, just giving a name before the dialog.

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Plotting Your Story

As I imagine the story piece by piece, a novel eventually takes shape.  But I want to emphasize that, for me at least, books don’t

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Heating Up

First off, let me explain that any one person might fulfill several roles. In other words, you might be able to fill three or four roles. Just as you can be a loving father, a tough soldier, and a devoted son to your mother, you can fill any of these roles listed below. In fact, to some degree you have to fill all of them. Yet if you are in a group with others who help support you, you may be stronger together than you are apart.

Read More »

How to Reach Your Writing Zone, Part 2

Getting into the zone often requires you to make repeated attempts to focus deeper and deeper upon your work. Indeed, now that I think about it, I can recall a couple of occasions when I found myself carried away in my work at a time when I already felt physically and emotionally exhausted.

Read More »

Trusting Your Process

As you do this you’ll find yourself thrust into an imaginary world where your character must react to stimuli and try to overcome obstacles. It only takes about 25 minutes of doing this for you to reach that Beta-state of consciousness.

Read More »

How to be an Imaginative Writer

Creating that world is a simple trick.  We “create” the world by reporting on it, repeatedly using images, sights, sounds, smells, and tastes that excite the mind and make it feel real.  Very often, to create that world requires us to repeat information in different ways.  For example, if I want to create “rain” in my story, I must have my reader see it coming in the distance, smell the taste of moisture in the air, feel the wet drops as they begin to plop down, and so on.  

Read More »

Creating Rooting Interest Early

We develop strong rooting interest and care more about characters who care deeply about something, who are committed to something.  Perhaps they care about their families, or have a powerful love for their country.  Maybe your character loves his horse, or is uncommonly honest or honorable.

Read More »

Greenlight Your Story’s Concept

In short, a story isn’t just one idea, it’s a conglomeration—basic concepts about characters, how and why they act, and how others react to them.  If you analyze even a short story, one that is only ten pages long, you’ll find that the author makes dozens, maybe even hundreds of choices regarding milieu, character, conflict, theme, and treatment.

Read More »

Rules for Your Writing Group

In our Apex writing group, Apex is an umbrella organization that provides services for a large number of writers, but we also encourage writers to do things in smaller groups. For example, some writers are having great success by meeting together for daily writing sprints, or weekly brainstorming sessions or critique groups.  Remember, a writing group is a living, growing thing. It may change over time, and your rules need to evolve with it.

Read More »

Deciding What to Write

Before you start writing a novel, screenplay, or any tale at all, you should look at two things:  Do you like the basic concept? Will the story sell? In short, before you write anything, you need to take an adequate survey of the field.  

Read More »

Deciding What to Write

Before you start writing a novel, screenplay, or any tale at all, you should decide a number of things:    1) Do you like the

Read More »

Writing Media Tie-ins

One perennial need is for novelists to write film or gaming tie-ins. If you are a successful writer, the chances are excellent that all kinds

Read More »

Plotting Your Story

As I imagine the story piece by piece, a novel eventually takes shape.  But I want to emphasize that, for me at least, books don’t

Read More »

Heating Up

First off, let me explain that any one person might fulfill several roles. In other words, you might be able to fill three or four roles. Just as you can be a loving father, a tough soldier, and a devoted son to your mother, you can fill any of these roles listed below. In fact, to some degree you have to fill all of them. Yet if you are in a group with others who help support you, you may be stronger together than you are apart.

Read More »
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Most Recent Free Writing Tip!
Time to Get Serious
Free Writing Tips

Time to Get Serious

A lot of people “play” at writing. We tend to think of it as a hobby or a pastime. But I sometimes wonder how much

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